CRAFT


Lost is over.

Some think “The End” suggested there were more tales to be told. Hurley and Ben remaining on the island was the equivalent of a western hero riding off into the sunset. You as the audience know there are still wrongs to be righted, evil to be fought, mysteries to be solved. But, we’ll never see these fights, because for us it is over. It was over right when they all crossed over into the great unknown in a Poly Faith sacred building.

I’ve embraced my other two blogs and have a new focus for the next few months—-Zombies!

Bite m--- I mean---Click me to read about zombies

I think we can all agree that the final season of Lost is one of the most argued about seasons of television ever. People are ravenous about how right they are and others are just wrong wrong wrong. If you’ve ever wandered through a Facebook message board on the subject of Lost, then you know what I’m talking about. I posted a link to one of my blog posts once, and it led to the near criminal level of harassment by a man ( I think it was a man) who conspicuously had the same name as a Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy character, and even more conspicuously, looked just like Lou Feriggno. That was the first time that I saw how crazy this show was making people. This person decided that he was absolutely right about everything and was willing to take time out of his day to literally hunt down people on the internet and insult them via Facebook, Twitter, and any other venue he could uncover. I followed his harassment of other people for one afternoon and was amazed how crazed this person was.  It got pretty personal. I had no desire to be beaten up by the Hulk. Although he probably looked more like this guy though.

CYBER BULLY!

So, my point. People, not me, but people, are dissatisfied with the end. Certain people have pointed me in the direction of fan fictions that would have played out the final season in an entirely different manner. I looked at two of them. They weren’t horrible, but I enjoyed the final season more than these ideas.

I began writing a response to one of these hypothetical endings. It was only supposed to be a paragraph. ONE paragraph.

That wasn’t enough space to say what I needed to say.

That paragraph opened up to a one-page treatment of sorts. Still not enough.

That treatment then expanded into an outline with character descriptions.

Some of the scenes needed dialogue. So I wrote it. When I was through, I realized I had written fan fiction. Shit.

What I had written was an alternative “B” storyline which could have been in the place of the Afterlife/ Purgatory / Sideways / Happy Ending storyline. I don’t know how this happened, but it did. And (embarrassingly) here is the first couple parts:

What if this were season 6’s flashes?

Episode 1 – We open on a young man that we do not know (or do we?) on a small two-person sailboat in a large harbor full of giant cargo ships. He is looking for a crew to help him find a mythical island said to hold the key to the origins of mankind. He has no family. He is an orphan.

He has recurring dreams of violence and darkness. In these dreams a group of people are battling for their lives on an island that isn’t an island. This dream always ends with an explosion of pure white light that is engulfed in a cloud of darkness.

He wakes from the dream and walks up into the city from the harbor. He enters a bar, where a heavy-set man makes fun of him for not being old enough to drink, “Maybe you should go back to your mommy little man.”

He continues to the bar where a woman’s voice speaks to him from behind, “You’re Aaron, right? I’m Anise.”

He turns.

“Do I know you?”

“No. But I know you. I dreamt about you.”

Episode 2 –

Aaron repeats, “Do I know you?”

“I’m Anise, and I’ve been dreaming about you since I was a child”

In her dream, Anise is always standing with Aaron, and holding his hand as the white light explosion erupts towards them.  They establish that they remember each other from when they were children.  They remember being on a plane, then on an island.

Next time—–  They find a charter and a man named LaFleur.

Advertisements

If you happen to be a Lost fan, (well what would you be doing here if you weren’t?)  and you are  in New York on Saturday September 25, at 4:00PM, the 2010 New York Television Festival will be hosting a series of events around the city, amongst which is an event entitled Creating Character: A discussion with Michael Emerson.

First Appearance - Season 2, Ep. 14 "One of Them"

Michael Emerson took a guest  appearance and became one of the most compelling characters on one of the best shows in the last decade.  He would consistently surprise in a show full of surprises.  His technique and mastery of his innate creepiness is something to be admired.  He can crack his voice as he raises an octave and create a tension most actors  never come close to achieving.   When Ben enters a room you never know if he’s going to hug, stab, converse, shoot, or just shake hands.  He is a wild card in a deck full of jokers.

Here is a description from the NYTVF website about the event:

The character of Ben Linus on “Lost” is one of the most memorable in the history of the medium. The actor who embodied him, Michael Emerson, was cast as a result of his Emmy winning turn as another indelible character: William Hinks on “The Practice.” Join us for an actor¹s point of view on how to create memorable characters.

I will gleefully be in attendance to bask in the presence of one of TV greatest villains.

Oh yeah!  The best part is—– It’s free!  Go get  tickets while you can! at this link :

http://www.thefestguide.com/nytvf2010/Creating_Character.html

Hello. You want to hang out and create character?

Toy Story 3 was a formulaic film that reached an earnest dénouement after a harrowing hero’s journey.

Or was it?

I think there was a more sinister formula at work here.

A zombie formula!

Read the rest over at Cinema Fantastica!  Click here….

Unexplainable pseudoscience technology has been the MacGuffin or catalyst for many good character driven sci-fi stories over the years. Storytellers have formulated hypotheses regarding the future of mankind ever  since Verne and Wells first wrote their tales of trips to the moon, time travel, underwater adventures, etc. I recently watched the film TiMER, starring Emma Caulfield of Buffy the Vampire Slayer fame. TiMER is a film set in a very near future, in which Scientists have been able to break down our auras, or time-lines, or pheromones, or something, so they can pin-point the exact day in your individual future that you will meet your honest to goodness soul mate. A TiMER, seen in the above picture, is then implanted in your wrist, which will count down until that day.

Damn it! I'm thirty!

The concept of the TiMER, in the wrong hands could have easily become a Logan’s Run, as thirty-year-olds obviously rebel against the stigmas that goes with age. Instead, it is a wonderful character film, which does–actually— like Logan’s Run, follow 29-year-old Oona as she approaches her thirtieth birthday, and worries that she will be alone forever. You see, Oona’s TiMER is blank. Which can mean one of three things: 1. Her soul mate doesn’t have a TiMER. They both need to have one for some reason. 2. She missed her chance. Or 3. She doesn’t have a soul mate.

The opening weekend gross of ROTK was strategically placed in the news scroll placing the intro of the TiMER in 2003.

The technology in TiMER is handled in such a wonderful and simultaneously ‘as a matter of fact’ way that it really needs no explanation, just an introduction.  The film opens with a series of news clips introducing the TiMER circa 2003.Through this montage, we arrive at the future, or rather the present of the film and a TiMER TV commercial, which markets the TiMER eerily like an  Apple product. Now, I do love my Mac, but it did not introduce me to my wife— who also has a Mac— Oh crap. Did we meet because of the Apple Corporation?! Digressing too far. The technology is simply stated at the beginning of the film to be what it was. Nothing else was necessary. The rest of the film is character driven.

Like the TiMER, Lost introduced several technologies and sciences that were simply stated for what they were. Like Han Solo declaring that the Kessel Run record-breaking ship the Millenium Falcon is the fastest ship in the Galaxy because it has a hyperdrive.  We just accept these scientific impossibilities because a character told us it was so, and it has been established in their universe that these things are possible. Some of these pseudosciences in Lost were as follows:

  • An Arctic Station to detect and pinpoint specific EM radiation bursts with amazing accuracy.
  • A Rat that is bathed in radiation so it’s mind travels into the future and it knows a path through a maze that it never ran before.
  • A magic button that will release magic electromagnetic energy every 108 minutes, thus saving the planet and maybe universe from annihilation.
  • Healing waters of a jungle temple protected by a hippie cult.
  • Time and space shifting donkey wheels.
  • Teleporting Islands.

Some Lost Science

But, my favorite was the time travel and characters becoming unstuck in time. The characters accepted the Time Travel with such ease, that I as a viewer accepted it as well. One day they were wandering the present day jungle, a flash of white light washed over them, and they found themselves in the 70’s. They accepted the shift, why wouldn’t I?

Another recent viewing, which, while amusing, could have played up its reality shifting goodness A LOT MORE, was Hot Tub Time Machine. I mean, come on, lets talk about a ridiculous time travel technology. They spill an illegal russian red bull called Chernobly on the controls of a hot tub, and their consciousnesses travel in time like Elly the rat! Whatever, I buy it. That is what I came here for. I rented this film knowing what I was getting into.  The only real problem I had with this film was that it felt like it was written by some kid that never experienced the eighties. He or she was probably a teen in the nineties and just wiki’d the eighties.  So they included the highlights of the 80’s, i.e. “Where’s the beef?, Poison,  Jessie’s Girl, flourescent clothing, etc.  There was so much more to the 80’s to make fun of.   Since it was at a Ski resort, I was hoping that Cusack’s character Adam would run into Lane Meyer, whom Cusack played in 1986’s Better Off Dead, another 80’s ski comedy.  That meeting would have been like a triple paradox!   Instead, they created way too much drama for four characters (A broken marriage, a suicide attempt, a shattered Cusack who ominously says “I didn’t do anything”) when it really should have been hilarity right through the whole thing.

80's things to make fun of: Sweat bands, John Travolta, One-man-army films, John Hughes, Ollie North, a Character that might be a Communist, a shopping montage, a training montage, someone randomly breaks into dance, nerds become cool, nerds get the girl, Jocks are evil, Principals or Deans are the devil, The Brat Pack, a robot with personality, and it should have ended with the entire resort gathering around someone doing something truly good and heroic and they would all applaud.

Just click em’ to go to ’em

The first is Neils Gaiman’s Rules for Writing Fiction:

The second is a look at the Spy genre and the 1988 film Little Nikita as related to the ten alleged spies held in NYC today:

CINEMA FANTASTICA! A new Post! Below is an excerpt:

A Face in The Crowd (1957) by Elia Kazan is a film that Netflix gave me a 4.9 out of 5 star possibility that I would enjoy it. 4.9 out of 5 seemed rather unlikely to me, because, well, I’ve always hated being told what to do. I was so wrong. I’m now a believer in the Netflix algorithm and think it is nigh flawless. I loved this film. It is the story of Lonesome Rhodes, amazingly portrayed by Andy Griffith, an Arkansas drunk with a bad marriage, a fraudulent annulment, and a larger than life personality.

Read the rest here: http://cinemafantastica.wordpress.com/2010/06/28/my-week-in-film-two-classics-my-hangover-and-the-hangover/

So, I’ve been gone for a while.  In the past four weeks I’ve accomplished a few things.

1. I wrote a TV Pilot for a Sitcom about a Super Villain.  It is a comedy of course.  Hopefully it will have some legs and something will come of it.

2. I finally decided on the name for my hub blog – Cinema Fantastica!  which will be the nexus for all my online endeavors.  All of my writings, reviews, scripts, cartoons, rants, jokes will be featured there.

I won’t be giving up I Always Have a Plan.  I’m still thinking about Lost all the time.  The Final season will be on DVD soon, and I look forward to watching it again.  I’m sure I’ll have a lot to say.  I’m sure I’ll notice more things.  I’m sure I’ll have a few crazy theories, and I look forward to sharing them.  I also look forward to hearing  all of your theories and ideas.

Below is an Excerpt from my new site, so you can check it out and see if it is your cuppa tea:

It was never my choice to love movies. Just like Alex DeLarge, I was conditioned, and it all started on October 19th, 1987 when the Stock Market took a massive plunge in what would later be referred to as the “Crash of 87″ and/or “Black Monday.” My family took a pretty big hit, and my father chose to use films for a singular purpose, escapism.

Pretty much every night for an entire year, at the tender age of 12, I was brought to the movies. I saw films that a child couldn’t and shouldn’t possibly understand (like Full Metal Jacket), movies that I would grow to love (Planes Trains and Automobiles, The Princess Bride, The Untouchables, Peggy Sue Got Married), movies I would initially love which would eventually would let me down (Monster Squad I just don’t love you anymore…). A wide spectrum of cinema was laid out before me, preparing me for my Über-obsessive immersion later in life.

To read more, click the image below, or here to go to http://cinemafantastica.wordpress.com/

Thanks for reading!

-Rob

Next Page »